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Obama Victory Garden Contest

By: Chris Stevens

The Washington Post reports that efforts by Eat the View  and TheWhoFarm to get food grown again on the White House lawn have made it into the top 30 ideas submitted to the change.org contest. The idea is one of over 7000 proposals submitted.

Ideas for Change in America is a nationwide competition to identify the best ideas for change in America. The top 10 ideas will be presented to the Obama administration just before inauguration day and form the basis of a nationwide advocacy campaign to turn each idea into actual policy.

In the entry, Victory Gardens 2.0, “thousands of Americans and people from the around the world are asking the Obamas to lead by example on climate change, health policy, economic self-reliance, food security, and energy independence by replanting an organic food garden at the White House with the produce going to the First Kitchen and to local food pantries.     
 
The many successes of the first Victory Garden movement were the result of effective public policy, bold leadership at a time of national crisis, and the commitment of millions of citizens who were ready to roll up their sleeves for the greater good.     
 
There’s no better, more symbolic place for launching a new National Victory Garden Program than at the White House, “America’s House”.  There’s no better, more urgent time than now.  And there’s NOTHING that can beat the fresh taste of locally-grown, home-cooked foods.”   
 
Cast your vote at Victory Gardens 2.0.

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